NHCW 2017: Serving a population where they live

Aug 18, 2017

On September 23, 2016, leaders from six Portland health organization gathered at Central City Concern’s Old Town Recovery Center to announce an unprecedented $21.5 million dollar investment in the Housing is Health initiative that will fund three new CCC buildings in Portland. The crown jewel of this shining trio is the Eastside Campus, which will serve medically fragile people and people recovering from substance use disorders and mental illness with a health care clinic and 172 housing units.

“This significant contribution is an excellent example of health organizations coming together for the common good of our community,” said Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO. “It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those who have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes."

Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

CCC will break ground on the Eastside Campus in late October 2017. The center will build on CCC’s existing Eastside Concern program, and will offer integrated housing and clinical services, including substance use disorder treatment, primary care and urgent care. More than 3,000 CCC patients each year will access care in a unique and welcoming health home environment.

The housing portion of the Eastside Campus will have about 172 units of housing, including short-term medical stabilization and palliative beds as well as transitional housing for people in recovery from behavioral health disorders. Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

“It’s important to serve people where they live."

“It’s important to serve people where they live,” said Blackburn. “This project will replicate the integrated care we give at our Old Town campus to help people get back on their feet and achieve health and self-sufficiency.”

The Housing is Health initiative is supported by Adventist Heath Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services. The new construction includes the Eastside Campus, Stark Street Apartments and Charlotte B. Rutherford Place apartments on N Interstate.

The CCC Eastside Campus is scheduled to open in Winter 2019.



NHCW 2017: Breaking down the walls between housing & health

Aug 15, 2017

While he waited for his name to rise to the top of the Central City Concern housing wait list, Glenn O. lived out of his van in northwest Portland. As he walked back to where he had last parked, he found his van stolen. Gone. And with it, all his possessions, including his dentures.

Not long after, he moved into CCC housing. But even with a roof over his head, his troubles weren’t over. The doctor he had begun seeing wanted him to eat healthier, but without dentures, the list of foods he could eat was short. What he could eat, and how he ate them, led to intestinal problems and months of feeling sick and uncomfortable.

He called his insurance to see if they would cover new dentures. After all, they were stolen, not carelessly lost. They said that they could only cover new dentures once every 10 years. He’d only had his dentures for three.

Glenn went back to gumming his food, feeling unhealthy, and going against his doctor’s orders.

• • •

Moving into Central City Concern permanent housing is often reason enough for our new residents to feel good about their trajectory. The assurance of having a roof over one’s head feels like a giant step forward toward something better. Indeed, we know that having housing is one of the most significant determinants of health, so becoming a resident of CCC housing is definitely an occasion to cheer.

However, being housed isn’t a guarantee that better health is on the horizon. Even for residents of CCC housing, especially those with more complex health care needs, successfully engaging with CCC’s health care services—or any health care services, for that matter—can feel like a world away. The connection between housing and health care is crucial: how well a resident's health needs are met is tied closely to a resident’s likelihood of successfully staying in housing, says Dana Schultz, Central City Concern’s Permanent Supportive Housing Manager.

Though CCC provides both housing and health care, the nature of the programs, as well as privacy considerations, have traditionally made it difficult to share information between the two areas of service. But where Dana saw walls, she also saw an opportunity. The situation called for a way to put teeth behind a core belief that housing is health. That way? A program called Housed and Healthy (H+H).

"Our supportive housing program realized that we can’t distance ourselves from our residents’ health—it’s everything to them and it’s everything to us."

“We started Housed and Healthy as an initiative to better support our residents’ health by engaging with them where they are: in our housing,” Dana says. “Our supportive housing program realized that we can’t distance ourselves from our residents’ health—it’s everything to them and it’s everything to us.”

The Housed and Healthy program serves to improve the connection between health clinics—be it CCC’s own Old Town Clinic and Old Town Recovery Center or other community providers—and CCC’s supportive housing program, and vice versa. Since H+H started, all new residents of CCC’s permanent housing are given a health assessment so that staff can gain a fuller picture of the new tenant. They are asked about their health insurance status, any chronic health conditions they may be dealing with, and who, if anyone, their primary care provider is.

Perhaps most importantly, new residents are asked to sign a release of information, which unlocks the line of communication between CCC’s housing and health service programs.

“Once the two program areas can start talking, we can immediately map out a web of support,” says Dana. “Our clinic can flag the resident’s electronic health record to show that they live in our housing and note who their resident service coordinator is in case they need their help reaching out to a patient. In turn, our resident service coordinators can know which providers and clinics their tenants are connected to in case health issues arise.”

Housed and Healthy represents a big shift in the way supportive housing sees its role in the well-being of its residents. Housing staff are integral to extending health care out from the clinic setting into where their patients live.

The health assessment can also help H+H coordinators identify potential issues—related to their physical or mental health, or to substance use disorder—that, if unaddressed, could result in a resident losing their housing because of violations that put the safety and peace of the rest of the housing community at risk.

“In the past, we’ve seen people not succeed in our housing for reasons that, in retrospect, were preventable,” she says. “If we know what to look out for and the team of support people we can coordinate with, we can put out fires before they really burn down a person’s entire life.”

Housed and Healthy represents a big shift in the way supportive housing sees its role in the well-being of its residents. Housing staff are integral to extending health care out from the clinic setting into where their patients live. H+H even brings opportunities for health education, such as chronic pain workshops and classes like Cooking Matters, straight to residents. In doing so, the chances that patients continue to have a place to live increase.

Glenn, who had seen Dana in his building frequently as part of her work as the H+H Coordinator, approached her about his denture problem. His issues didn’t put him at high risk of losing his housing yet, but he wanted to follow his doctor’s eating advice. He was, after all, nearly three years sober, and he wanted to continue feeling healthier.

She promised him that she’d look into it. She consulted with Glenn’s Old Town Clinic care team. She researched resources and made countless phone calls. Several weeks later, she gave Glenn the best news he’d received since learning that he had his own CCC apartment: she found a city program that would cover nearly the entire cost of new dentures.

“Dana did all the work I didn’t know how to do. The questions she asked me sounded like she knew a lot about what I needed,” Glenn says. “Now that I have dentures again, oh yeah, I feel healthier now. I’m so grateful to her.”

While Housed and Healthy is ostensibly a housing program, it functions as a way to not only expose residents to the many ways to better health, but as a de facto arm of health services that can reach into where their patients live. Gaps in care get caught and filled; residents are supported in better utilizing health care services; and people like Glenn find trustworthy faces to bring health-related concerns.

“Our housing staff want to see our residents healthier; health care providers want to see their patients housed,” Dana says. “It just makes sense.”



CCC Breaks Ground on New 51-unit Family Housing Community

Aug 03, 2017

On Wednesday, August 2, Central City Concern (CCC) broke ground on the first of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative—a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health systems in supportive, affordable housing. CCC also announced the name of the building—Charlotte B. Rutherford Place—which honors one of Portland’s pioneering African American families and their impact on the entire community.

Multnomah County Commissioner Loretta Smith, Portland City Commissioner Dan Saltzman, Providence Health & Services - Oregon Regional Chief Executive Dave Underriner, KeyBank Key Community Development Corporation Vice President Beth Palmer Wirtz and the Honorable Charlotte Rutherford spoke.

The 51-unit apartment building (34 one-bedroom and 17 two-bedroom units) is part of the City of Portland’s N/NE Neighborhood Housing Strategy to address displacement and gentrification in the historic neighborhoods of North and Northeast Portland by prioritizing longtime or displaced residents with ties to the community for new affordable housing opportunities in the area.

Hon. Charlotte Rutherford is a community activist and former civil rights attorney, journalist, administrative law judge and entrepreneur. Her parents, Otto G. Rutherford and Verdell Burdine, were major figures in Portland’s Black civil rights struggle. Her father was president and her mother was secretary of Portland’s NAACP chapter in the 1950s, and they played an important role in passing the 1953 Oregon Civil Rights Bill. Her grandfather, William, ran a barbershop in the Golden West Hotel—now a CCC residential building—and Otto worked there as well. Charlotte still lives in Portland’s Albina District, in the same house in which she grew up.

     

"I'm so honored to accept this for the entire Rutherford family, especially my mom and dad," Ms. Rutherford said.

Charlotte Rutherford Place major contributors include KeyBank, Portland Housing Bureau, Oregon Housing and Community Services and the Housing is Health coalition of six health organizations: Adventist Health Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services - Oregon.

“The Housing is Health contribution is an excellent example of health care organizations coming together for the common good of our community. Housing for lower income working people is critical to the improvement of health outcomes.” said Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO. “This housing will remain affordable for generations and it couldn’t come at a better time.”

The design and development team is Home First, the architect is Doug Circosta and the builder is Silco Construction. CCC is engaged in a $3.5 million capital campaign to complete funding for three buildings that will all break ground by the end of October.



"I can’t believe I get to move in here..."

Jul 13, 2017

On a perfect sunny July afternoon in Southwest Portland’s Lair Hill neighborhood, several dozen people gathered in the parking lot of Hill Park Apartments to drink iced coffee and celebrate the new building’s grand opening.

Soon-to-be resident Kellie Knight cut the ceremonial ribbon after sharing her story. “I don’t even have words right now,” she told the crowd. “I can’t believe I get to move in here and have some place that I can call home.” Kellie was addicted to drugs and in and out of prison for most of her life until she came to Central City Concern (CCC) in 2015. She now has full-time permanent employment and, for the first time, her own apartment.

CCC, Portland’s nonprofit serving people impacted by homelessness, poverty and addictions since 1979, opened the 39-unit housing building on July 11. It’s a three-story building on the edge of Portland’s southwest downtown area, close to transportation, parks and shopping. It will include supportive services for the residents of eight units that will be home to people living with mental illness. The apartments are spacious with ceiling fans and natural wood accents. The Earth Advantage-certified building is energy efficient with solar panels.

“We understand that downtown belongs to everybody. If we’re going to have a healthy downtown, we need it to reflect a certain set of values. Those values turn into people and those people turn into a diverse city that we can be proud of,” said Ed Blackburn, CCC’s president and CEO. “This building is adding to that.”

Mayor Ted Wheeler was there as well. “This is a community effort, one that we can all be proud of,” he said. “In my opinion, this represents one of the great ways this city comes together to help some of the most vulnerable people in our community get back on their feet.”

Commissioner Dan Saltzman shared that his family had moved into the Lair Hill neighborhood in the 1920s when it was predominantly occupied by Italian and Jewish immigrants. “This has always been a vibrant neighborhood,” Saltzman said. “I hope that these Hill Park Apartments will be as good to its residents as this area has been to my family.”

Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury explained how the eight residents managing mental illness are receiving and will continue to receive appropriate support from CCC’s behavioral health staff. These residents are engaged with Central City Concern’s outpatient behavioral health program—the Old Town Recovery Center—where they receive many services and will have access to CCC’s proven integrated care models. They will also be empowered and supported in carving their path to self-sufficiency. “We know that by connecting people to the resources that they need they can overcome barriers and truly change their lives,” she said. “However, without housing there is no healing. Housing is indeed health care.”

Other speakers at the grand opening included Sean Hubert, CCC’s chief housing and employment officer; Rachel Solotaroff, CCC’s chief medical officer; Jeri Young from US Bank and Margaret Salazar from Oregon Housing and Community Services.

     

Hill Park Apartments has 39 units: 17 studio and 22 one-bedroom. Major contributors include US Bank, Portland Housing Bureau, Oregon Housing and Community Services, Oregon Health Authority, Home Forward, Providence Health & Services, and Energy Trust of Oregon. Further, Steven Stone and Elana Stone Anderson of BedMart teamed up with Tempur-Pedic Mattresses to donate 30 mattresses for the incoming residents; the donation was facilitated by CCC's longtime partner, Community Warehouse.

The architect is Carleton Hart Architecture and the general contractor is Colas Construction, Inc.



Getting the Most out of Life

May 30, 2017

I lost my kids at 26 years old. They were ages eight, seven, and three. The only one I got to keep was the one I was pregnant with. I turned 27 in jail, the baby due in three months, and nowhere to go when I got out. That’s when I turned to Central City Concern. Having been in my addiction on and off for 12 years, in and out of jail, homeless, and unable to take care of myself, let alone three little kids and a newborn, I was out of options. While in jail, someone told me about Central City Concern’s Letty Owings Center (a residential treatment program for pregnant women and those with young children).


I entered treatment on March 3, 2011—the day I stopped harming myself, and started healing. Going into an in-patient program was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. There were schedules, expectations, lots of sharing, and so much emphasis on accountability and self-care. I gave birth to my son Tristyn while at Letty Owings Center. He was baby number 232 born to a clean and sober mother while at Letty Owings. I was so proud to be that mother. Tristyn was healthy, and I was fully committed to learning how to be the mom he needed. Letty Owings Center exposed me to a different way of thinking and gave me new skills like planning, healthy meal preparation, money management, handing conflicts in a respectful way, positive parenting, and patience. I used a lot of the tools they taught me while I attended ongoing treatment sessions and I still use the tools today. I learned to accept help, to live life on life’s terms, and most of all I learned how to stay positive and what it takes to be a good parent. The experience I got at Letty Owings Center set me free to seek a better life for me and my family.

After I completed in-patient treatment, Central City Concern provided Tristyn and me with a studio apartment at Laura’s Place (three to six months of transitional housing for women who complete treatment at Letty Owings Center). There was more flexibility at Laura’s Place but I still had a lot of work to do on myself so I stayed on a schedule and didn’t rush the healing process. I tried to remember everything I learned at Letty Owings Center and every day, I managed my life better and better. I did outpatient treatment at Central City Concern Recovery Center four times a week. I went to recovery meetings, mental health appointments, and made an effort to listen to others. I didn’t have to fake it anymore, or be afraid, because I was actually learning how to function in society. I wanted success and I wanted to get all my kids back so I could show them a different way of life than what we had during my addiction. I was inspired by other women who were facing similar challenges, and gained confidence every day. When a bigger unit became available, my daughter Cheyenne, who’d been in foster care for a year, was able to come live with us. Life was improving.

We lived at Laura’s Place for four months and then I was given the opportunity to move into a Central City Concern family housing community. That’s when my son Ellias and my daughter Reyna got to move in. I was drug- and alcohol-free, physically and mentally thriving, and had all four of my children under the same roof. The support I got while in family housing was amazing. I had a mentor who I still keep in touch with today. She helped me through the death of my best friend, and motivated me to keep making healthy decisions. I was able to go back to school and pursue a promising future—one that I was given the freedom to envision while in safe and secure Central City Concern family housing. 

Through it all, housing played the biggest role in my transformation. Housing was the first stable piece. Once I had housing I was able to work on everything else—my recovery, going to school, paying off student loans, getting employed and off public assistance, doing therapy with my children, and teaching my kids right from wrong. I was able to move from one step to the next, not out of desperation but out of growth and informed thinking. If you don’t have a place to call home, it’s hard to get any traction. 

Housing gave me peace of mind because I knew where my kids and I were going to be sleeping every night. It gave me a safe place to start getting the most out of life. I want to be a good mom for so many reasons. Most of all because my kids deserve it. I put them through the wringer with unpredictable behavior, foster care, and not being there when they needed me.

I want them to know that your past doesn’t have to be your future. I want them to know that life doesn’t have to involve a screaming mom. They’ve been so resilient and I am so proud. My kids are smart, respectful, and well behaved—not what you would expect after what they’ve been through. Today, they would describe me as strict, fair, and fun. I feel like that describes a good mom.

Every day I look in the mirror and I’m amazed: I look calm, I look happy and I look in control of my life. There are still challenges, but I take them on with a clear head—one day at a time. Six years ago I could not have imagined that I would be the person I am today. I’ve earned an Associate’s degree and am currently in school working toward a Bachelor’s in Human Development. I could not imagine that all four kids would be with me and that I would have my driver’s license back and that I would be where I’m at education wise, career wise, and family wise. Every single step I’ve taken along the way was fundamental in getting me where I am today. It all became possible when I was offered housing and got the support I needed in order to grow into the person my kids can count on. It all became possible through Central City Concern.



Another Successful We Are Family Fundraiser!

May 22, 2017

Central City Concern's annual fundraiser for the Letty Owings Center and Family Housing programs took place on Tuesday, May 2, at the Multnomah Athletic Club.During the program, CCC's Dr. Rachel Solotaroff sat down with Jamie (right) and her son, Dante (center), to talk about how CCC's Letty Owings Center and Family Housing have changed their lives.CCC Executive Director Ed Blackburn kicked off the program by welcoming the crowd of nearly 400.CCC Chief Medical Officer Dr. Rachel Solotaroff spoke about Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs), how they contribute to cycles of poverty, and how those cycles can and are broken.
Chief Housing & Employment Officer Sean Hubert spoke about generational poverty and the steps CCC is taking to provide housing for families in need.Former CCC Chief Administrative Officer Rebecca Birenbaum made a heartfelt pitch to the audience of the need to support CCC's Letty Owings Center and Family Housing programs.Dante was a fantastic helper during the evening-ending raffle!We were thrilled to have Letty Owings Center Co-Founder Nancy Anderson (left) join us for the evening, pictured here with with CCC Executive Coordinator E.V. Armitage (right).The evening's entertainment was provided by  Jazz Society of Oregon Hall of Famer Shirley Nanette.

Central City Concern's annual fundraiser for the Letty Owings Center and Family Housing programs took place on Tuesday, May 2, at the Multnomah Athletic Club. Click on a photo to begin the slideshow.

• • •

On May 2, Central City Concern held our annual “We Are Family” fundraising dinner for Letty Owings Center, celebrating 20 years as a Central City Concern program, and our Family Housing programs. The big event took place for the fourth consecutive year at the Multnomah Athletic Club in southwest Portland. Rain couldn’t keep the partygoers away and a good time was had by all.

The evening’s program was led off by Executive Director Ed Blackburn, then Chief Housing and Employment Officer Sean Hubert offered thoughts on generational poverty and the steps Central City Concern is taking to provide housing for families in need. Chief Medical Officer Dr. Rachel Solotaroff followed Sean with powerful insight on Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs). She spoke of how CCC addresses childhood trauma while helping people break the cycle of addiction and poverty.

Our featured guest was Family Housing resident and mother Jamie, along with her 10-year-old son Dante. Jamie shared her story of overcoming addiction in the safe and supportive environment of Letty Owings Center, a six-month residential addiction treatment program for pregnant women and those with young children. She also talked about her transition from Letty Owings Center to CCC Family Housing, where she has a family mentor, has learned basic money management, and continues to safely raise and care for her three children. Jamie’s goals include pursuing a career as a medical assistant after completing the prerequisites at Portland Community College.

Entertainment was provided by Jazz Society of Oregon Hall of Famer Shirley Nanette and Friends. Stumptown Photo Booth added to the to the picture perfect night.

All in all, close to 400 guests attended to celebrate and support our families and raised over $120,000 for the Letty Owings Center, which has witnessed the births of more than 270 babies, and the Family Housing program, which is home to 154 families.



​‘Tis the season for CCC's Adopt-A-Child Program!

Nov 04, 2016

This year, Central City Concern opened a new building in Clackamas County, which became home to 60 families. That makes 148 families now living in Central City Concern family housing.

We are thankful for 236 children sleeping, learning, and growing in safe, supportive, and healthy homes. Now it’s time to give them some unforgettable holiday memories. Our goal is to make sure all 236 children have gifts to open this year.

     

Please consider fulfilling the wish list of one or more children by registering individually, or as a group, to help provide holiday presents for all. We will share the first name and gift wish list of each child you choose to adopt.

Additionally, here are a few other ways you can help during the holiday season:

- Start a Toy Drive at your workplace.
- Send gift cards for families to fulfill wish lists.

For more information on how you can get involved, please contact Melissa Bishop at 971-352-8715 or melissa.bishop@ccconcern.org.

Thank you so much!

 



Six health care organizations partner with CCC

Oct 11, 2016

We are so excited about our new collaboration with six Oregon healthcare organizations that was announced on September 23. Adventist Health, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services are joining together to invest $21.5 million in a unique partnership to respond to Portland’s urgent challenges in affordable housing, homelessness and healthcare. This unprecedented collaboration has gained national attention.

The investment will support 382 new housing units across three locations, including one with an integrated health center in Southeast Portland.

Governor Kate Brown said, "This project reflects what we've known for a long time -- health begins where we live, learn, work, and play. Stable, affordable housing and health care access are so often intertwined, and I’m gratified to see collaborative solutions coming from some of our state’s leading organizations. I applaud the efforts of all those involved and am grateful for the partnership in moving Oregon forward and making ours a home where each Oregonian thrives."

"It’s exciting that health care providers recognize the deep connection between housing and health care," said Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury. "This is exactly the kind of collaboration that our community needs during this housing crisis. None of us can solve homelessness alone. But this collaboration will change hundreds of lives at a critical time of need."

Eastside Health Center will serve medically fragile people and people in recovery from addictions and mental illness with a first-floor clinic and housing for 176 people. The center will also become the new home for an existing Central City Concern program, Eastside Concern, and will offer 24-hour medical staffing on one floor.

Stark Street Apartments in East Portland will provide 155 units of workforce housing.

Interstate Apartments in North Portland will provide 51 units designed for families. It is part of Portland’s North/Northeast Neighborhood Housing Strategy to help displaced residents return to their neighborhood.

This significant contribution is an excellent example of healthcare organizations coming together for the common good of our community. It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those that have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes. This housing will remain affordable for generations and it couldn’t come at a better time.

"Health and home go hand-in-hand," said Nan Roman, President and CEO of the National Alliance to End Homelessness. "This is a breakthrough collaboration with the health care community and a partnership that has the potential to change the landscape of how we can end homelessness in this country."

Though the health care organizations' contributions are significant, CCC will finance the remainder of the costs, about $37 million, through tax credits, loans and fundraising. Our upcoming capital campaign is an opportunity for everyone to contribute to this project.

• • •

About Housing is Health: The Housing is Health network supports innovative approaches to housing and healthcare in the Portland region.

Learn more at www.centralcityconcern.org/announcement and join the conversation on social media at #HousingisHealth.

See photos from the press conference.

News articles:

- New York Times (AP)
- The Oregonian
- KGW
- OPB



Town Center Courtyards Is Keeping Families Together

Jul 25, 2016

Amber L. is absolutely over the moon. The 27-year-old mom is moving back to Clackamas, Ore., where she grew up, into a brand new apartment. “I am so happy to be coming back with my son to a safe, beautiful home,” she told the crowd of close to 100 people who attended the grand opening of Town Center Courtyards on Wednesday, July 20.

Town Center Courtyards will become a stable, supportive home for families who are homeless or vulnerable to homelessness. The 60-unit, mixed-income apartment complex is a shining example of form and function. All the units have exterior doors and overlook courtyards where families can socialize and kids can play. The apartments are spacious and bright. There will be two Central City Concern (CCC) staff members on-site to help residents with life skills, employment, educational development, recovery, parenting and wellness support. The neighborhood is well located near public transportation, public schools, public parks, child care centers, grocery stores and numerous employment opportunities.

CCC Family Housing has served more than 1,000 families since 2000. Just last year, our Family Housing program served 122 families that included 189 children:

- 75 kids were able to stay with their families and avoid foster care.
- 79 of those families were able to find permanent housing.
- 30 of the parents found employment and 20 entered school. One parent even graduated from college.

But clients can wait as long as six months to access family housing. Town Center Courtyards will add 60 units (20 one-bedroom, one-bath; 32 two-bedrooms, one-bath; 8 three-bedrooms, 1.5 bath) to CCC’s existing 92 units of family housing.

Town Center Courtyards was completed on time and ahead of schedule. Families should start moving in during August. This is just one of several CCC affordable housing projects moving forward this summer.

Town Center Courtyards is the result of robust collaboration between CCC, Clackamas County, Oregon Housing & Community Services and U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation, as well as many foundations and individual donors. These partners are providing the opportunity for families to have a safe, affordable place to call home.

During the grand opening, Clackamas County Commissioner Martha Schrader, Director of Clackamas County Housing & Community Development Chuck Robbins, Director of Oregon Housing & Community Services Claire Seguin, Vice-president of U.S. Bancorp Community Development Corporation Ann Melone, and CCC’s Senior Director of Housing and Recovery Support Services Sharon Fitzgerald all spoke of the importance of supporting the community by providing affordable housing in which families can thrive.

Amber says she was filled with gratitude when she cut the ribbon to officially open Town Center Courtyards. “Thank you for making my dream come true," she said.



An historic $258 million bond measure for affordable housing in Portland

Jul 08, 2016

Central City Concern is committed to reducing homelessness in Portland. We believe everyone deserves to have a place called home. Working families should be able to live where they work. Seniors who built our neighborhoods should be able to thrive here through their golden years. But because of significant growth and stagnant incomes, Portland has a huge shortage of affordable housing: affordable housing helps everyone by creating a safe, equitable and healthy community.

That’s why Central City Concern supports the Welcome Home Coalition’s Yes for Affordable Homes campaign, which is dedicated to funding affordable housing development in Portland. On June 30, the Portland City Council voted to refer a historic affordable housing bond to the November ballot, giving voters a chance to make a critically needed investment in our community. The $258.4 million bond will:

- Add permanently affordable housing – an estimated 1,300 units, 600 of which will be reserved for very low-income households (0-30 percent median family income, which is up to about $22,000 for a family of four)

- Stabilize existing affordable housing in changing neighborhoods

- Ensure thousands of homes are protected from the market

- Protect communities of color, seniors, families, children and people with disabilities

- Prevent and reverse displacement.

Housing prices in the Portland metro area are rising at an alarming rate. National research shows when the average rent increases by $100 per month, homelessness increases by 15 percent. In 2015, average Portland rents increased by $128.

Please join us in supporting the Yes for Affordable Homes campaign. We can all join together to prevent homelessness and preserve our healthy Portland neighborhoods.

For more information on the Yes for Affordable Homes campaign, visit the Welcome Home Coalition website.