CCC’s Employment Access Center teams with WorkSource to offer even more services

Sep 04, 2017

Labor Day represents more than just mattress sales, camping and the unofficial start of fall. At Central City Concern (CCC) we celebrate the importance of employment on a person’s path to self-sufficiency. CCC’s Employment Access Center (EAC) offers CCC clients a one-stop employment assistance center with multiple resources including access to computers, the internet, tutorials, personal voicemail, a printer and copier, and telephone and fax services.

In late 2016, WorkSource Portland Metro opened an Express Center at the EAC (2 NW 2nd Ave.) to serve the public. The CCC WorkSource Express Center is open on Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and is staffed by WorkSource employment specialists. So far in 2017, the center has helped about 600 job seekers to engage with training programs, obtain job search assistance including referrals and get help with online applications, document formatting and general questions.

“We are very pleased to host a WorkSource Express Center in our Employment Access Center,” says Clay Cooper, CCC’s director of Social Enterprises and Employment Services. “We want to expand CCC’s employment services to include everyone in the downtown area seeking employment. WorkSource helps us do that, and adds value for our existing clients.”

“We want to expand CCC’s employment services to include everyone in the downtown area seeking employment. WorkSource helps us do that, and adds value for our existing clients.”

Finding a job can be overwhelming, especially for people entering or reentering the workforce after a rough patch in life. CCC’s EAC and WorkSource Express Center has many resources to help. In 2016, the EAC assisted nearly 1,000 job seekers. And every time a client gets a job, he or she rings the bell in the front lobby. It’s the sound of achievement and celebration!



NHCW 2017: Serving a population where they live

Aug 18, 2017

On September 23, 2016, leaders from six Portland health organization gathered at Central City Concern’s Old Town Recovery Center to announce an unprecedented $21.5 million dollar investment in the Housing is Health initiative that will fund three new CCC buildings in Portland. The crown jewel of this shining trio is the Eastside Campus, which will serve medically fragile people and people recovering from substance use disorders and mental illness with a health care clinic and 172 housing units.

“This significant contribution is an excellent example of health organizations coming together for the common good of our community,” said Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO. “It also represents a transformational recognition that housing for lower income working people, including those who have experienced homelessness, is critical to the improvement of health outcomes."

Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

CCC will break ground on the Eastside Campus in late October 2017. The center will build on CCC’s existing Eastside Concern program, and will offer integrated housing and clinical services, including substance use disorder treatment, primary care and urgent care. More than 3,000 CCC patients each year will access care in a unique and welcoming health home environment.

The housing portion of the Eastside Campus will have about 172 units of housing, including short-term medical stabilization and palliative beds as well as transitional housing for people in recovery from behavioral health disorders. Each floor is designed to foster healthy peer relationships, with vibrant common spaces where residents, supported by CCC staff, can build community.

“It’s important to serve people where they live."

“It’s important to serve people where they live,” said Blackburn. “This project will replicate the integrated care we give at our Old Town campus to help people get back on their feet and achieve health and self-sufficiency.”

The Housing is Health initiative is supported by Adventist Heath Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services. The new construction includes the Eastside Campus, Stark Street Apartments and Charlotte B. Rutherford Place apartments on N Interstate.

The CCC Eastside Campus is scheduled to open in Winter 2019.



NHCW 2017: Starting primary care engagement outside clinic walls

Aug 16, 2017

There are few professions in the world that call on you to do your job in an RV, but that’s where Catherine Hull found herself a few weeks ago, helping the person who lived inside fill out intake paperwork. If she minds the odd working environment, she certainly doesn’t show it. After all, her role as Central City Concern’s Community Health Outreach Worker (CHOW) has also taken her under bridges and overpasses, into day centers and shelters, and onto most of the streets that form downtown Portland.

“My days are almost always pretty uncertain. A lot of the time, I get a phone call or an email and I’m off to respond at the drop of a hat,” she says. “Once I get to where I’m needed, I can help people figure out the different needs they have.”

CCC’s CHOW program was originally created partly in response to the difficulty of phone outreach to individuals who, though insured, weren’t engaging with our Old Town Clinic or any other primary care clinic, often leaving chronic health conditions unmanaged. Rather, these folks were utilizing the emergency room or acute care services at high rates for needs that could have been taken care of, and even avoided, with a primary care provider.

These potential patients—most unhoused or low-income—didn’t need reminders; they needed relationships to enter into and navigate a health care world that was as confusing as it was untrustworthy.

Calling people wasn’t enough. These potential patients—most unhoused or low-income—didn’t need reminders; they needed relationships to enter into and navigate a health care world that was as confusing as it was untrustworthy. So Catherine started hitting the pavement.

Hospitals contact Catherine when an emergency room patient who they had previously referred to the Old Town Clinic for primary care shows up again and again. Community members phone get in touch when they feel compelled to help someone on the street they see every day. CCC programs like Hooper Detox call her when a patient needs to establish a primary care provider in order to be referred to other programs. As long as there’s someone to meet, she goes.

Through it all, Catherine practices profound empathy. While following through on a primary care appointment may seem like a small task to many, she understands—and hears firsthand—what stands in the way.

“Patients typically have to wait a few weeks after their initial intake to see a provider, and that can clearly be frustrating when we’re asking them to take charge of their health,” Catherine says. “A lot of the time their primary concern isn’t primary care at all; it’s their substance use disorder or mental health or the simple fact that they don’t have a home.”

Lack of transportation, sleep deprivation, fear of being judged by a doctor, and a feeling of stuck in their situation place additional barriers to engaging with primary care. Catherine listens and then does what she can to help each person inch closer to primary care. She performs intakes on the spot, ensuring that the individual can see a provider even sooner. She hands out bus tickets, offers assurances that our care providers truly have heard it all before and are not in the business of judging, and true to her self-given title of “the queen of resources,” offers information that can be of any further help.

“It’s understandable that if someone doesn’t know where they’re sleeping each night, a clinic appointment two weeks from now won’t be at the top of their mind. So we’ll make a plan to look for each other on 4th Ave. every day to check in until the day of the appointment,” she says. “I’m hoping to bring what little bit of the clinic I can take with me to where they are.”

In addition to responding to calls and emails, Catherine holds hours twice a week at CCC’s Bud Clark Acute Care Clinic, which treats acute issues as a bridge until patients feel ready to engage with a primary care home. When a patient feels ready, Catherine is there to seize the moment.

“The ability of our patients to access care has improved markedly by having Catherine do her outreach,” says Pat Buckley, a provider who splits her time between Bud Clark Clinic and Old Town Clinic. “She facilitates people who desperately need to get into a primary care environment very quickly. CHOW’s been an amazing adjunct to CCC’s practice.”

“I’m hoping to bring what little bit of the clinic I can take with me to where they are.”

Catherine is aware that the CHOW program won’t result in every person she sees engaging with primary care, but she remains hopeful for each person she meets.

“Of course my goal is to get them excited about primary care, but if I can at least get them to start thinking about it, I’ll take it. I’ll keep trying as hard as I can to help them understand that primary care is a good thing to do, but I’ll always be understanding that there are so many things in the way.”

Until then, Catherine will continue going to where the people who don’t think they’re quite ready for primary care are. An RV one day, an underpass the next, and maybe an ER bed later. All of it is worthwhile as long as the people she meets get closer to setting foot inside Old Town Clinic.



CCC Celebrates National Health Center Week 2017!

Aug 14, 2017

Happy National Health Center Week from Central City Concern!

The health center movement was born during a time of extraordinary challenge, opportunity, and innovation in the United States. Today, as we face threats to the Affordable Care Act, a HUD budget proposal that would reduce housing subsidies by more than $900 million nationwide, and crises like the opioid epidemic and Portland’s housing affordability crisis, I find myself reflecting on our predecessors in the good fight for health care, housing, and equal opportunity and against poverty, homelessness, and oppression. We have a long way to go, but I take heart in recognizing how far we’ve come in the past fifty years.

Today, one in fifteen members of our community receive their care at a federally qualified health center. Here in Oregon, almost all of our FQHCs are designated by the state health authority as patient-centered primary care homes, meaning that they meet six core performance standards (access to care, accountability, comprehensiveness, continuity, coordination and integration, and patient and family-centered) that support positive patient outcomes, good experience of and access to care, and cost control and sustainability. Just a few weeks ago, we at CCC were thrilled to have our Old Town Clinic recognized as a Tier 5 patient-centered primary care home, achieving the highest level of recognition possible in the state. Being homeless or low-income in Portland doesn’t mean receiving substandard care: we should feel deep pride as a community that our most vulnerable friends and neighbors have access to excellent care through our health centers.

Along with providing high-quality, sustainable, accessible care, health centers like Central City Concern also partner closely with other social services providers and health care organizations. At CCC, we bring together health, housing, and jobs under one organizational roof, and we also rely on and treasure our relationships with community partners, who enable us to reach far more people than we would on our own. At the Bud Clark Commons, we partner with Home Forward, Transition Projects, Inc., and others to provide urgent care, mental health, and case management services to homeless and formerly homeless Portlanders. At our Puentes program, which provides culturally and linguistically specific behavioral health care to Portland’s Latino community, our close partnership with El Programa Hispano Católico enables us to bring care into places where the community already gathers. And across our continuum of substance use disorder services, we’re partnering closely with our friends at CODA, Inc., and Health Share of Oregon to develop and implement Wheelhouse, a hub-and-spoke model of care that will enhance access to medication-assisted treatment for people with opioid use disorders. When homeless and low-income Portlanders access services through Central City Concern, they’re tapping into a much larger network of support both within CCC and with our partners.

This year, in keeping with National Health Center Week 2017’s theme of Celebrating America’s Health Centers: The Key to Healthier Communities, we wanted to share some of the ways in which CCC, together with many partners, works to bring high-quality care into our surrounding community by extending our work past clinic walls and directly to where people are. You’ll learn about how our programs work to improve access, outcomes, and sustainability to support the people we serve and our larger community. We may still have a way to go, but we’re going together.

Leslie Tallyn
Chief Clinical Operations Officer



CCC Breaks Ground on New 51-unit Family Housing Community

Aug 03, 2017

On Wednesday, August 2, Central City Concern (CCC) broke ground on the first of three buildings in the Housing is Health initiative—a pioneering commitment from local hospitals and health systems in supportive, affordable housing. CCC also announced the name of the building—Charlotte B. Rutherford Place—which honors one of Portland’s pioneering African American families and their impact on the entire community.

Multnomah County Commissioner Loretta Smith, Portland City Commissioner Dan Saltzman, Providence Health & Services - Oregon Regional Chief Executive Dave Underriner, KeyBank Key Community Development Corporation Vice President Beth Palmer Wirtz and the Honorable Charlotte Rutherford spoke.

The 51-unit apartment building (34 one-bedroom and 17 two-bedroom units) is part of the City of Portland’s N/NE Neighborhood Housing Strategy to address displacement and gentrification in the historic neighborhoods of North and Northeast Portland by prioritizing longtime or displaced residents with ties to the community for new affordable housing opportunities in the area.

Hon. Charlotte Rutherford is a community activist and former civil rights attorney, journalist, administrative law judge and entrepreneur. Her parents, Otto G. Rutherford and Verdell Burdine, were major figures in Portland’s Black civil rights struggle. Her father was president and her mother was secretary of Portland’s NAACP chapter in the 1950s, and they played an important role in passing the 1953 Oregon Civil Rights Bill. Her grandfather, William, ran a barbershop in the Golden West Hotel—now a CCC residential building—and Otto worked there as well. Charlotte still lives in Portland’s Albina District, in the same house in which she grew up.

     

"I'm so honored to accept this for the entire Rutherford family, especially my mom and dad," Ms. Rutherford said.

Charlotte Rutherford Place major contributors include KeyBank, Portland Housing Bureau, Oregon Housing and Community Services and the Housing is Health coalition of six health organizations: Adventist Health Portland, CareOregon, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, OHSU and Providence Health & Services - Oregon.

“The Housing is Health contribution is an excellent example of health care organizations coming together for the common good of our community. Housing for lower income working people is critical to the improvement of health outcomes.” said Ed Blackburn, CCC president and CEO. “This housing will remain affordable for generations and it couldn’t come at a better time.”

The design and development team is Home First, the architect is Doug Circosta and the builder is Silco Construction. CCC is engaged in a $3.5 million capital campaign to complete funding for three buildings that will all break ground by the end of October.



"I can’t believe I get to move in here..."

Jul 13, 2017

On a perfect sunny July afternoon in Southwest Portland’s Lair Hill neighborhood, several dozen people gathered in the parking lot of Hill Park Apartments to drink iced coffee and celebrate the new building’s grand opening.

Soon-to-be resident Kellie Knight cut the ceremonial ribbon after sharing her story. “I don’t even have words right now,” she told the crowd. “I can’t believe I get to move in here and have some place that I can call home.” Kellie was addicted to drugs and in and out of prison for most of her life until she came to Central City Concern (CCC) in 2015. She now has full-time permanent employment and, for the first time, her own apartment.

CCC, Portland’s nonprofit serving people impacted by homelessness, poverty and addictions since 1979, opened the 39-unit housing building on July 11. It’s a three-story building on the edge of Portland’s southwest downtown area, close to transportation, parks and shopping. It will include supportive services for the residents of eight units that will be home to people living with mental illness. The apartments are spacious with ceiling fans and natural wood accents. The Earth Advantage-certified building is energy efficient with solar panels.

“We understand that downtown belongs to everybody. If we’re going to have a healthy downtown, we need it to reflect a certain set of values. Those values turn into people and those people turn into a diverse city that we can be proud of,” said Ed Blackburn, CCC’s president and CEO. “This building is adding to that.”

Mayor Ted Wheeler was there as well. “This is a community effort, one that we can all be proud of,” he said. “In my opinion, this represents one of the great ways this city comes together to help some of the most vulnerable people in our community get back on their feet.”

Commissioner Dan Saltzman shared that his family had moved into the Lair Hill neighborhood in the 1920s when it was predominantly occupied by Italian and Jewish immigrants. “This has always been a vibrant neighborhood,” Saltzman said. “I hope that these Hill Park Apartments will be as good to its residents as this area has been to my family.”

Multnomah County Chair Deborah Kafoury explained how the eight residents managing mental illness are receiving and will continue to receive appropriate support from CCC’s behavioral health staff. These residents are engaged with Central City Concern’s outpatient behavioral health program—the Old Town Recovery Center—where they receive many services and will have access to CCC’s proven integrated care models. They will also be empowered and supported in carving their path to self-sufficiency. “We know that by connecting people to the resources that they need they can overcome barriers and truly change their lives,” she said. “However, without housing there is no healing. Housing is indeed health care.”

Other speakers at the grand opening included Sean Hubert, CCC’s chief housing and employment officer; Rachel Solotaroff, CCC’s chief medical officer; Jeri Young from US Bank and Margaret Salazar from Oregon Housing and Community Services.

     

Hill Park Apartments has 39 units: 17 studio and 22 one-bedroom. Major contributors include US Bank, Portland Housing Bureau, Oregon Housing and Community Services, Oregon Health Authority, Home Forward, Providence Health & Services, and Energy Trust of Oregon. Further, Steven Stone and Elana Stone Anderson of BedMart teamed up with Tempur-Pedic Mattresses to donate 30 mattresses for the incoming residents; the donation was facilitated by CCC's longtime partner, Community Warehouse.

The architect is Carleton Hart Architecture and the general contractor is Colas Construction, Inc.



Moving Forward with Persistence & Determination

Jun 20, 2017

Freda Ceaser, Director of Employment Services, told the graduates, Representatives from local colleges and universities with whom CCC partners to provide scholarships were recognized.
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On Tuesday, June 13, CCC recognized 16 employees who earned diplomas ranging from a GED to master’s degrees, and awarded scholarships to 12 employees continuing their studies in higher education. Click on a photo to begin the slideshow of select photos from the event.

• • •

“If you get, give. If you learn, teach.” –Maya Angelou

Central City Concern (CCC) has a work culture based on compassion. A huge component of our day-to-day experience is promoting learning, both in ourselves as well as the people we serve. Every June for the last four years, CCC has honored the self-motivated learners who work for our agency and have pursued formal education on their own time.

This year, on Tuesday, June 13, CCC recognized 16 employees who earned diplomas ranging from a GED to master’s degrees, and awarded scholarships to 12 employees who are continuing their studies in higher education. CCC partners with local colleges and universities to provide monetary help for selected students/employees.

The commencement ceremony featured words of congratulation and encouragement from Joe Chapman, CCC’s chief human resources officer, who told the participants, “you exemplify two important factors: persistence and determination.” Amanda McGovern, CCC paralegal and scholarship recipient, quoted inspiring words from Maya Angelou. And Freda Ceaser, CCC’s director of Employment Services, told her story of coming to CCC from prison, working her way up to a director position, raising a family, and gaining her college degree at the same time. “If I can do it,” she assured, “anyone can do it.”

One graduate, Kari Fiori, a CCC recovery peer mentor for the Recovery Mentor Program, received her BS in Public Health from Portland State University. She couldn’t attend the CCC commencement but sent written remarks: “I'm so happy I'm getting my Bachelor's degree, 29 years after beginning my college career in California,” she wrote. “My recovery is still my top priority, and because of that, I get to participate in my life in a way I never thought possible.”

Another graduate, Jay McIntyre, received his BS in Portland State University’s Management and Leadership program. Jay is CCC’s Clean and Safe/Clean Start Program Manager. He first came to CCC as a recovering client in 2007 when he moved into the Estate building and got involved with CCC’s Employment Access Center.

Jay started working at CCC in January 2008 as an on-call janitor. He quickly got a regular position turning over rooms, and was then promoted to a Janitor 2 position with more responsibility. “I was grateful for a job, but I knew my potential was more,” Jay said. “I had my GED and needed to go back to school to get further in life.”

He applied to PSU in 2014 and dove into the program with help from his parents and grants. “A CCC/PSU scholarship covered the gap in tuition and books for two years,” Jay said. “It was a godsend. I am so grateful for the opportunity. It’s fantastic to get to the next level.”

Jay and his wife, who also came through CCC programs, have a blended family of five children and now own their own home. His daughter graduated from high school this month. For the last three years, Jay has spent every weekend on school work; he’s looking forward to having more time with his family. “I was doing it for me and so my family has a better life,” he said. Fittingly, he graduated on Father’s Day. “I started with a little goal plus another little goal; eventually they all add up. Once you get that self-confidence, you can reach for the stars.”



CCC Clean Start: Keeping Portland Clean & Giving Workers a Fresh Start

Jun 06, 2017

As the weather warms and the days grow longer, people take more notice of what’s going on in their neighborhoods. Central City Concern’s (CCC) Clean Start program helps keep neighborhoods clean by clearing away trash and removing graffiti. It’s also a mentored six-month work experience that gives people an opportunity to work, grow and gain crucial experience and confidence to pursue employment opportunities. CCC Clean Start runs three Portland crews and one in Gresham, each consisting of two people and a truck.

Local residents can access CCC Clean Start through the City of Portland’s One Point of Contact page online form or the PDX Reporter app. The City reviews the request and often calls upon CCC Clean Start crews to visit the area to clear trash or assist campers with cleaning. CCC Clean Start crews do not move people from sites or participate in campground “sweeps.” Their mission is to help keep neighborhoods free of litter and debris, as well as to provide residents of encampments with resources to maintain a safe and hygienic environment.

In April 2017, the three Portland CCC Clean Start crews removed 3,511 bags of trash and 1,350 needles.

Additionally, CCC Clean Start contracts with the Portland Downtown Business Improvement District to operate Downtown Clean & Safe, a service that cleans a 213-block area in central downtown and along the bus mall. CCC Clean Start also operates a temporary storage locker near the west end of the Steel Bridge where people who have no place to call home can put their belongings for a few hours while they work or seek employment.

Each two-person team has a trainee who once experienced homelessness. These trainees receive minimum wage, work 40 hours per week for 6-months and learn valuable soft skills. Toward the end of their six-month work experience, CCC Clean Start employees engage in practical, employment development workshops at CCC’s Employment Access Center where they receive one-on-one assistance in the job search process.

Some graduates move on to CCC employment in janitorial, maintenance, pest control and painting roles that maintain CCC’s 23 buildings. Others find permanent employment outside of the agency.

CCC Clean Start program keeps neighborhoods clean and gives workers a chance to gain experience and skills. It’s a win-win. For more information, visit the CCC Clean Start webpage.



CCC Celebrates Addition to the Healing Through Art Collection

May 25, 2017

Laura Ross-Paul | Power of the Pacific, 1989 | Oil on canvas, 60”x72” | Donated by Laura Ross-PaulKatherine Ace | Conversation, 2007 | Oil/alkyd, paper, gold leaf and insect wings, 36”x36” | Donated by Katherine AceMike Newman | untitled (Pentecost) | Butterfly on metal with paint/acid, 15.5”x19” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanRick Bartow | Story (12/50), 2000 | Lithograph, 17”x14” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanBill Brewer | A Blind Knowing, 1993 | Acrylic on panel, 30”x16” | Donated by Bob Kochs & Phyllis OsborneFrank Boyden | LITH, 1993 | Etching (10/30), 18”x18” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia Engelman
Erinn Kennedy | Blue Gem, 2001 | Acrylic, 10”x10” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanGregory Grenon | Dahlias, 1999 | Lithograph (5/75), 18”x15” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanWhitney Nye | Riff, 2002 | Acrylic, alkyd, paper, glass on wood panel, 24”x24” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanSusan McKinnon | Interiors #4, 1992 | Watercolor, 26”x26” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanJules Olitski | Elegy, 2002 | Color screenprint edition 108, 34”x42” | Donated by Bennett & Sylvia EngelmanDavid Slader | Eulogy for a Pastrami Sandwich, 2014 | Oil/oil crayon on panel on canvas, 36”x48” | Donated by David Slader
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Phase 2 of the Healing Through Art Collection consists of nearly 100 pieces of original fine art. Click on a photo to begin the slideshow of select pieces.

• • •

On Friday, May 19, Central City Concern celebrated the completion of Phase 2 of the Healing Through Art Collection, which placed nearly 100 beautiful and healing artworks in CCC housing and program sites across the Portland metro area.

Since 2012, patients, staff members, and guests of CCC’s Old Town Clinic and Old Town Recovery Center, collectively known as our downtown health campus, have enjoyed our Healing Though Art Collection. By late 2015, the collection had grown to nearly 60 pieces of fine art (from 35 artists based in the Pacific Northwest), each curated, procured, and approved for its aesthetic, healing, and calming properties.

But the collection inside the health campus—the product of several years of work done by the all-volunteer Art Task Force—turned out to be just the beginning.

Because the Healing Through Art collection consistently received such enthusiastic and appreciative response from clients and staff alike, the Art Task Force was asked to continue their work in order to bring original fine art into several CCC housing communities and program sites, including Miracles Central, Madrona Studios, the Sally McCracken Building, the Estate Hotel Building, and the Puentes program. The volunteer Art Task Force spent more than a year on this addition to the Healing Through Art collection, dubbed Phase 2, carefully selecting, procuring, and placing works across the five new sites.

The May 19 celebration brought together the Art Task Force, donors to Phase 2, several artists whose works are represented in the updated collection, and representatives from several local galleries who have both donated and provided guidance for the collection. Members of the Portland Art Museum Northwest Art Council joined the event.

CCC Executive Director Ed Blackburn kicked off the evening by thanking donors, artists, and volunteers for their support while providing an overview of CCC’s care model. He also shared how the artwork hung on the walls of our clinic spaces and housing communities impact the wellbeing of the people we serve.

Art Task Force Chair Pam Baker provided the history of the collection and called out each Phase 2 donor. She also announced that work on Phase 3 of the Healing Through Art Collection would begin shortly to extend the collection into the historic Golden West Hotel building where our Imani Center program is based, as well as the two housing communities and the combined housing and clinic building that slated to be completed in 2018 as part of Central City Concern’s Housing is Health initiative.

Special guest Grace Kook-Anderson, Portland Art Museum’s Curator of Northwest Art, concluded the program by speaking about how specific pieces in the collection stood out to her. She also shared that she was thrilled that the Healing Through Art collection brought such high-quality work to the population CCC serves.

Find the full list of the pieces that comprise Phase 2 of the Healing Through Art Collection and their donors by downloading the Healing Through Art Phase 2 addendum.

The volunteer Art Task Force that worked on Phase 2 include:

  • Pam Baker
  • Alice McCartor
  • Carole Romm
  • Marcy Schwartz
  • Kathleen Stephenson-Kuhn
  • Dan Winter


A View from the Edge of the Mat

Apr 28, 2017

As you’ve seen by this week’s previous pieces, Living Yoga has truly ingrained themselves in Central City Concern programming. Luckily, it sounds like our class participants have endeared themselves to their teachers, as well.

“This was my first real experience of volunteering and I am so grateful for the opportunity that Living Yoga and CCC gave me to teach yoga to some of the most engaging and committed class participants,” shared a volunteer instructor, Diane, who teaches classes at Old Town Clinic. On several occasions, she’s shared that her “weekly yoga volunteer hour is the best hour of my whole week.”

With that warmth and positivity, and in the spirit of collaboration, volunteerism, and serving those who have so much to share, we wanted to finish our National Volunteer Week celebration with a piece from Laura Walsh. One of the very first Living Yoga volunteer instructors to give her time to Central City Concern—she started at Old Town Clinic some nine years ago!—Laura’s experience, wisdom, and beautiful writing seemed like the perfect way to conclude an amazing week.

Thank you, volunteers, for helping Central City Concern do more and do better with compassion, kindness, and an inspirational sense of service.

• • •

There’s a little story about some yogis sitting at the edge of a lake in meditation. All of a sudden, one of them jumps up and runs across the lake and comes back with a shawl, puts it on, and resumes a sitting posture. A little while later, another one of the group runs across the lake and whispers she needed to check on the soup for dinner. Well, after a bit more time goes by, a more recent member stands up and says, “Ahem… seems I forgot my mala beads.” He heads out to edge of the lake, takes a running start, and quickly becomes completely wet—splashing and struggling for footing before making his way to shore again. This scenario was repeated a couple of more times before the first yogi turns to the second and asks, “Do you suppose we might tell him where the rocks are in the lake?”

A chuckle, maybe? Some recognition of one time or another continuing to use the same unskillful ways to “reach” or gain solid ground—getting a proverbial “soaking” in the process? While there are several images or metaphors to illustrate “the way” or “path,” it essentially does come back to “the journey,” yes?

In this little vignette there is the sense that each person’s intention is to travel to the other side. The teaching rests in each person finding his or her own way. For one, it may mean paying attention to how others negotiate an obstacle and what skills are needed; another may ask questions and explore the conditions of the lake; someone might walk around while another could build a raft; one possibly could find a friend with a boat or even begin an active swimming regimen. Could a map, compass, or even a guide be of help?

The yoga of “IT” is in discovering how to honor one’s circumstances and nature with a practice to live in the “ground” of life’s circumstances—the union of all in and around “the lake.” A quote from Carl Rogers, “The curious paradox is that when I accept myself just as I am, then I can change,” brings us again to the image of the lake.

What I have experienced in my years sharing yoga at Old Town Clinic is that there is a readiness of participants to begin the sitting and the process of travel. There is a place for each person to symbolically look into the surface of the water for a reflection of how things are at that present time. There is a quality of movement within a contained landscape. Old Town Clinic continues to provide the opportunity for offering an environment where people are supported to engage in their proverbial lakeside experience—yoga is one of the elements that assist in safe and also challenging passage.

That there is a willingness to roll out the mat and take one’s seat is one of the most courageous and affirming acts in yoga. When we begin class, yogis are reminded of the principle, ahimsa, which translates as “non-harming.” One is reminded to offer kindness and respect and to bring a gentleness to the current state of body and mind. When we link breath awareness to movement or into stillness there is a space to notice what may be present and alive and asking for attention in that moment—to do or not do…. to sit at the edge of the “lake” or to enter into the “flow” of movement.

I am ever so grateful to be a part of this community and value the time spent with the ever-positive, present, and insightful Old Town Clinic staff ally, Moira. Over the years there have been people coming to yoga as part of a treatment program or a wellness regimen, to explore calming and regulating practices, or even for a place to rest. There has been a consistent member of our yoga collective who I offer deep gratitude for his brilliance, wisdom, discernment, and generosity of spirit. He gives expression to how yoga aligns one in well-being off the mat and into the world.

To those new to the practice, to those who are curious, and to some who find it not useful or of interest… thanks for showing up and for “getting the toes wet.” Maybe some will come back or may find interest in another discipline which offers healthful benefits… or maybe not, too. All who have come to my classes, however, have been such good sports!

For your trust and good-natured spirits to try, to modify, to be patient or curious, to stay with, to be with, and to allow for or to witness—I celebrate you. I thank you. I feel touched by the quality of intimate space created by sharing breath, time, and effort together.

So, at the edge of the lake… sharing a few lines from a noted author and activist, Wendell Berry, and then “jumping” in!

Expect the end of the world. Laugh.
Laughter is immeasurable. Be joyful though
you have considered all the facts.

Namaste